Key Stage 4

Key Stage 4

GCSE Design and Technology

Students who take GCSE Design and Technology follow the AQA Design and Technology GCSE (9–1) course. The GCSE places greater emphasis on understanding and applying iterative design processes. Students will use their creativity and imagination to design and make prototypes that solve real and relevant problems, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values.

The course currently a linear qualification where students must complete all assessments at the end of the course and in the same series. The GCSE qualification is divided as follows:

Examination paper 1

100 marks (2 hours, summer series) 50% of overall grade

What’s assessed?

Section A - Core Technical Principles (20 marks)

Multiple choice and short answer questions assess broad technical knowledge and understanding, with cross curricular links to maths and science.

Section B – Specialist Technical Principles (30 marks)

Several short answer questions (2-5 marks) and one extended response to assess a more in depth knowledge of technical principles.

Section C – Designing and Making Principles (50 marks)

Short and extended response questions, includes a 12 mark design question and a mathematical problem solving question.

Non Examined Assessment (NEA)

100 marks (35 hours, released on June 1st year 10) 50% of overall grade

What’s assessed?

The practical application of the overarching three theoretical principles from the examination preparation.  This is taken in the spirit of the iterative design process to produce a substantial design where students investigate, design, make, analyse and evaluate.  Students will produce a working prototype and a 20 page electronic portfolio of evidence following the release of project contexts on 1st June in year 10.

Design and Technology: Course delivery schedule

Core Technical Principles

Year 9
New and emerging technologies – learn about the impact of new and emerging technologies on the workplace, tools and equipment; how products are designed to have less impact on others

 

Energy generation and storage – learn about use of renewable and non-renewable sources; energy storage; batteries

 

Developments in new materials – learn about modern, smart, composite and technical materials

 

Systems approach to designing – learn about input, process and output devices

 

Mechanical devices – learn about motion; links and levers; mechanisms; rotary systems

 

Materials and their working properties – learn about classification, properties and uses of:- papers/boards, natural and manufactured timbers, metals, polymers, textiles

Specialist Technical Principles

Year 9

Selection of materials or components – learn about factors to consider when selecting materials or components and their influence on design of products

 

Forces and stresses – learn about types of forces acting on structures; enhancing materials to resist forces

 

Ecological and social footprint – ecological and social issues that influence product design; the 6 R’s of sustainability

 

Sources and origins – learn about how paper is manufactured; how timbers are processed; how textiles are manufactured

 

Using and working with materials – learn how to shape and form materials; how materials can be modified for a specific purpose; how material properties influence use

 

Minor Project – Iterative design following a contextual challenge

Year 10

Stock forms, types and sizes – learn about calculating material usage; stock forms of paper/board, timber OR polymers; availability of standard components;

 

Scales of production – learn about how products are produced in different volumes; manufacturing methods to suit scales of production

 

Specialist techniques and processes – learn about use of production aids; tools and equipment; cutting and shaping materials to tolerance; commercial processes; quality control

 

Surface treatments and finishes – learn about how to prepare materials and apply surface finishes to materials; how treatments and finishes can improve the aesthetics and performance of a material

Design and Making Principles

Year 10

Investigation, primary and secondary data – learn how to use primary and secondary data for user needs; how to write a design brief and specification; how to investigate user problems and needs
 
Environmental, social and economic challenge – learn about design constraints from:- deforestation, global warning, Carbon dioxide, global warming, Fairtrade
 
The work of others – learn about how designs are influenced by designers and companies
 
 
Design strategies – learn about methods that designers use to support the design process i.e. collaboration, systems approach, iteration
 
 
Communication of design ideas – learn about design techniques used to represent and communicate designs
 
 
Prototype development – learn how prototypes are used to convey a design idea in response to client’s needs; how to evaluate a prototype
 
 
Selection of materials and components – learn how to select and use materials and components based upon function, cost and availability
 
 
Tolerances – learn how and why materials are cut and shaped to tolerances for products
 
 
Material management – learn about minimising wastage of materials when cutting and shaping for a product; use of allowances to assist in making a product
 
 
Specialist tools and equipment -  how to use a laser cutter for timbers and polymers, how polymers can be formed through blow moulding; safe use of tools and equipment
 
 
Specialist techniques and processes – learn about how to select the appropriate techniques or processes in order to provide quality outcomes i.e. accuracy, reduction of waste, improve aesthetics and functionality
 
Major Project – Contexts set by exam board (1st June)
Year 11
Major Project – Contexts set by exam board
 
 
Mock exam revision – focussed recap of theory and practice with examination techniques
 
Exam revision – a scheduled programme of theory, knowledge and understanding the examination question

WJEC Level 1-2 Vocational Award in Hospitality and Catering

Aims

The hospitality and catering sector includes all businesses that provide food, beverages, and/or accommodation services. This includes restaurants, hotels, pubs and bars.  It also includes airlines, tourist attractions, hospitals and sports venues; businesses where hospitality and catering is not their primary service but is increasingly important to their success.  The WJEC Level 1/2 Vocational Award in Hospitality and Catering has been designed to support our students who want to learn about this vocational sector and the potential it can offer them for their careers or further study.  It is most suitable as a foundation for further study.

How it’s assessed

The WJEC Level 1/2 Vocational Award in Hospitality and Catering is made up of two mandatory units:

  • Unit 1 The Hospitality and Catering Industry
  • Unit 2 Hospitality and Catering in Action

 Learners must complete both units.

Unit 1: The Hospitality and Catering Industry will be externally assessed

 The external assessment is available in June each year. Duration: 90 minutes

Number of marks: 90

Learners apply their learning by considering all aspects of the vocational sector. They should acquire knowledge of all aspects of the industry and be able to propose new hospitality and catering provision for specific locations. Learners will be able to use their learning of different types of establishment and job roles to determine the best option. They will then apply their learning in relation to front of house and kitchen operations to determine how the proposed hospitality and catering provision will operate efficiently legally and financially viable whilst meeting the needs of their potential market. This unit provides a broad introduction to the vocational sector in a way that is purposeful and develops a range of transferable skills.

Unit 2: Hospitality and Catering in Action is internally assessed:

Learners apply their learning to safely prepare, cook and present nutritional dishes.  They will draw on their learning of different types of provision and kitchen and front of house operations in Unit 1, as well as personal safety in their preparations.  The content is relevant not only to employees within food production, but also those with a responsibility for food safety in the industry, nutritionists and managers and owners. This extends the learners appreciation of the whole vocational area beyond the kitchen environment.

Hospitality and Catering: Course delivery schedule

Year 9

Content
Practical Skills
Term 1
UNIT 1
Introduction to the course
Personal attributes of Hospitality and Catering employees
Hygiene – personal, food and kitchen
Food-related causes of ill health – microbes and other contaminants
Food safety legislation
HACCP
Knife skills – salads
Soup
Stir fry
Fruit crumble
Cake making – creaming method
Rubbing in method
Scones
Whisking method
Melting method
All-in-one steamed sponge pudding
Pastry making
Short crust pastry
Seasonal cookery
Term 2
Food labelling
Environmental Health Officers role
Health and Safety for employers and employees
Risks and control measures
Structure of Hospitality and Catering
Jobs in the industry
Pastry making – flaky pastry
Batter - pancakes
Soda bread
Bread dough –use for pizza
Sweet bread dough
Seasonal practical
Term 3
Hospitality and Catering standards
Jobs
Factors affecting success
The operation of a catering kitchen
Equipment used in catering
Customer requirements
Sauces –
reduced
all-in-one
roux
egg custard
Blind baking
Choux pastry
BBQ food
Use of gelatine/setting agent
Chilled desserts
Year 10
 
 
Term 1
Unit 2
The function of nutrients
Healthy eating
Diet related conditions
Nutritional needs of specific groups of people
Special diets for different food choices and medical conditions
Effect on nutrients of cooking methods
Practical related to the content i.e. protein, fat, carbohydrate rich dish etc.
Low fat, low sugar, low salt, high fibre etc.
Term 2
Menu planning – to include menu styles, special diets etc.
Environmental issues and menu planning – carbon foot print, packaging, sustainability, food waste
Menu planning to meet consumer needs
Organoleptic testing
Cost
Planning the production of a menu
Practical content related to the content i.e. special diets
Term 3
Revision for online assessment
 
After exam
Commodities – meat, fish, dairy products, cereals, vegetables, fruit and soya products
Cooking methods
Practice assessment – work through an example.
 
 
 
Practical work to demonstrate the preparation and cooking of each commodity.
Year 11
 
 
Term 1
Commodities – meat, fish, dairy products, cereals, vegetables, fruit and soya products
Cooking methods
 
 
Internal assessment Completion of internal assessment if necessary
Practical work to demonstrate the preparation and cooking of each commodity
 
Internal assessment practical
Term 2
Completion of internal assessment if necessary (possible to repeat assessment once only)
Revision of Unit 1
 
Term 3
Revision and Final exam if necessary

 

BTEC Level 1-2 First Award in Construction and the Built Environment

Aims

This qualification is designed for as an introductory Level 1/Level 2 course for those students who want to study in the vocational context of the Construction sector, and is aimed to prepare them for further study and, in due course, to enter the workplace.
This course studies construction and the built environment, allowing students to gain a broad knowledge and understanding of the industry.  They will develop skills such as interpreting and analysing information, identifying the infrastructure required for safe and efficient work and in understanding how client needs can shape building design. 
How it’s assessed
The BTEC Level 1/2 First Award in Construction and the Built Environment is made up of three mandatory units: 
  • Unit 1 Construction Technology (externally assessed)
  • Unit 2 Scientific and Mathematical Applications for Construction (internally assessed)
  • Unit 3 Construction and Design (internally assessed)
 And one specialist unit: 
  • Unit 5 Exploring Carpentry and Joinery Principles and Techniques (internally assessed)

Construction: Course content

Unit 1 Construction Technology (externally assessed)
  • 1.A Understand the structural performance required for low-rise construction
  • 1.A.1 Performance requirements 
  • The in-situ requirements for elements of a building, the characteristics, properties, location, features and applications, and the interaction of different elements making up the sub-structure and superstructure. Learners will need to be able to demonstrate the use of sketching techniques. How buildings are designed and constructed, considering: ● strength ● stability ● fire resistance ● thermal insulation ● sound insulation ● weather resistance ● sustainability
  • 1.A.2  Common structural forms for low-rise construction 
For the following construction methods, understand how they are designed and detailed, what the terminology of each component is called, how and why each method differs, and the advantages and disadvantages of each structural form. Learners will need to be able to demonstrate the use of sketching techniques.
 
  • 1.B Explore how sub-structures are constructed 
  • 1.B.1 Preconstruction work 
For the following activities that have to be completed before work can begin on site, understand why they are carried out, what has to be provided on a site, and how it is accomplished. Learners will need to be able to demonstrate the use of sketching techniques and associated calculations (areas, volumes, distances, perimeters and time durations).
  • 1.B.2 Sub-structure groundworks 
How sub-structures are constructed safely.  For the following, understand what is used, why it is used (including potential hazards), where it is used and how it is achieved. Learners will need to be able to demonstrate the use of sketching techniques and associated calculations (areas, volumes, distances, perimeters).
  • 1.C Explore how superstructures are constructed
  • 1.C.1 Superstructures – walls 
For the following, understand what is used, where it is used, why it is used and how it is achieved. Learners will need to be able to demonstrate the use of sketching techniques and associated calculations (areas, volumes, distances, perimeters).
  • 1.C.2 Superstructures – floors 
For the following, understand what is used, where it is used, why it is used and how it is achieved. Learners will need to be able to demonstrate the use of sketching techniques and associated calculations (areas, volumes, distances, perimeters).
  • 1.C.3 Superstructures – roofs 
For the following, understand what is used, where it is used, why it is used and how it is achieved. Learners will need to be able to demonstrate the use of sketching techniques and associated calculations (areas, volumes, distances, perimeters).
Unit 2 Scientific and Mathematical Applications for Construction (internally assessed)
  • 2.A Understand the effects of forces and temperature changes on materials used in construction
  • 2.A.1 Effect of forces 
Understand the effect of forces on construction materials.
  • 2.A.2 Changes in Temperature 
Understand how changes in temperature affect construction materials.
  • 2.B Use mathematical techniques to solve construction problems
  • 2.B.1 Algebraic and graphical methods
  • 2.B.2 Mensuration  
Measurement of area of square, rectangle, triangle, circle and trapezium, and surface areas and volumes of cubes, prisms and cylinders.
  • 2.B.3 Trigonometry
Unit 3 Construction and Design (internally assessed - synoptic)
  • 3.A Understand the work of the construction industry
  • 3.A.1 The construction industry and the built environment
Understand how the construction industry contributes to and impacts on wider society.
  • 3.A.2 The type of activities undertaken in the construction industry 
Know the range of work that the construction industry undertakes.
  • 3.B Understand a client’s needs to develop a design brief for a low-rise building
  • 3.B.1 Understanding a client’s needs 
Understanding the client’s needs in terms of sustainability, use, accommodation, style and aesthetics
  • 3.B.2 Understanding the constraints on design
The client and design team will need to consider other influences and constraints on design to include resources, local planning, building control and planning
  • 3.B.3 Production of a client brief for a low-rise building 
Using the analysis of needs and constraints, produce a client brief that will aid the development of appropriate design solutions:  existing situation;  project requirements;  budget; design factors and constraints; specification for internal and external features; mood board; end users
  • 3.C Produce a range of initial sketch ideas to meet the requirements of a client brief for a low-rise building
  • 3.C.1 Generation of initial sketch ideas to facilitate development of the final design solution: Initial sketch ideas in response to the client brief; Client approval and review of ideas against the client brief; Responding to client feedback; Initial calculation to design solution
Unit 5 Exploring Carpentry and Joinery Principles and Techniques (internally assessed)
  • 5.A Understand tools, materials and equipment used in carpentry and joinery 
  • 5.A.1 Tools, materials, equipment and information for carpentry and joinery
Purpose and use of tools, materials, equipment and information for carpentry and joinery tasks.
  • 5.A.2 Safe use and storage of the carpentry and joinery tools, materials  and equipment
  • 5.B Develop practical skills using safe techniques to produce a timber frame
  • 5.B.1 Health and safety
Risk assessment prior to starting the activity and approved procedures during the practical activity
  • 5.B.2 Construction of a timber frame 
Measuring, marking out, cutting and constructing timber joints.